What are normal child hearing test results?

What is the hearing range for children?

The ‘normal’ hearing frequency range of a healthy young person is about 20 to 20,000Hz. Though a ‘normal’ audible range for loudness is from 0 to 180dB, anything over 85dB is considered damaging, so we should try not to go there.

Is 20 dB hearing normal?

A hearing loss of up to 20 decibels below the hearing threshold is still considered to be normal hearing. More severe hearing loss can be described according to severity, as follows: Mild hearing loss: Hearing loss of 20 to 40 decibels. Moderate hearing loss: Hearing loss of 41 to 60 decibels.

What does borderline normal hearing mean?

Borderline / Normal Hearing:

May have problems in difficult listening situations (such as in groups or in noise) May need visual cues (to watch the speaker’s face and especially lips) to understand some conversations and certain speakers. May need to sit close to the speaker to understand the conversation.

Is 15 dB normal hearing?

If you can only hear sounds when they are at 30 dB, you have a mild hearing loss.

Degree of Hearing Loss.

Degree of hearing loss Hearing loss range (dB HL)
Normal –10 to 15
Slight 16 to 25
Mild 26 to 40
Moderate 41 to 55
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What are good numbers on a hearing test?

Normal hearing: -10 to 20 dB. Mild hearing loss: 20 to 40 dB higher than normal. Moderate hearing loss: 40 to 70 dB higher than normal. Severe hearing loss: 70 to 90 dB higher than normal.

How do they check a 2 year olds hearing?

A toddler’s hearing assessment may include the tests mentioned above, along with these:

  1. Play audiometry. A test that uses an electrical machine to send sounds at different volumes and pitches into your child’s ears. …
  2. Visual reinforcement audiometry (VRA). A test where the child is trained to look toward a sound source.

How do I know if my child has hearing problems?

Some possible signs of hearing loss in an infant or toddler

  • Does not react to loud sounds.
  • Does not seek out or detect where sound is coming from.
  • Has stopped babbling and experimenting with making sounds.
  • Still babbles but is not moving to more understandable speech.
  • Does not react to voices, even when being held.