What do the numbers mean on a contraction monitor?

What is a normal contraction number?

During normal labor, the amplitude of contractions increases from an average of 30 mm Hg in early labor to 50 mm Hg in later first stage and 50 to 80 mm Hg during the second stage. The uterus is not a flaccid sac but has baseline tone.

What is the Toco number for contractions?

Table 1

Variable Mean Range
Duration of monitoring (min) 137 48.6 – 345.9
IUPC contractions 38.3 8 – 95
EHG contractions 37.7 8 – 94
Toco contractions 26.4 1 – 64

How strong should contractions be on monitor?

Uterine monitoring is based on the idea that the frequency of contractions per hour increases as a woman gets closer to delivery. As labor progresses, contractions get longer, harder, and stronger. If the machine measures four or less contractions per hour, you’re probably not in labor.

What is Toco in labor?

Introduction. Women in labor are traditionally monitored with the tocodynamometer (TOCO), which is based on the pressure force produced by the contorting abdomen during uterine contractions. The contractions are measured by a pressure transducer placed on the patient’s abdomen.

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How do you measure the strength of contractions?

The strength of the contraction is measured from the baseline (when the uterus is relaxed) to the peak of the contraction and is recorded in units-one unit is the amount of pressure it takes to raise a column of mercury one millimeter.

What does a contraction look like on the monitor?

The monitor records the duration of contractions and the time between them but doesn’t tell you the strength of the contraction. Each contraction resembles a hill or a bell-shaped curve, starting low, rising slowly, and then returning to baseline.

What is a Braxton Hicks contraction?

Braxton-Hicks contractions, also known as prodromal or false labor pains, are contractions of the uterus that typically are not felt until the second or third trimester of the pregnancy. Braxton-Hicks contractions are the body’s way of preparing for true labor, but they do not indicate that labor has begun.

How do I know the difference between Braxton Hicks and real contractions?

Real contractions follow a consistent pattern, while Braxton-Hicks contractions vary in duration and frequency. Braxton-Hicks contractions also tend to be less painful and usually only cause discomfort in the front of the abdomen. Braxton-Hicks contractions simulate real contractions to prepare the body for labor.

How do you count contractions?

When timing contractions, start counting from the beginning of one contraction to the beginning of the next. The easiest way to time contractions is to write down on paper the time each contraction starts and its duration, or count the seconds the actual contraction lasts, as shown in the example below.

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How many MMHG is a strong contraction?

The intensity of Braxton Hicks contractions varies between approximately 5-25 mm Hg (a measure of pressure). For comparison, during true labor the intensity of a contraction is between 40-60 mm Hg in the beginning of the active phase.

What do early labor contractions feel like?

Early labor contractions may feel as if you have an upset stomach or trouble with your digestive system. You may feel them like a tidal wave because they increase and finally subside gradually. Some women feel intense cramps that increase in intensity and stop after they deliver.